[1967] The Centennial Record of the University of California, compiled and edited by Verne A. Stadtman and the Centennial Publications Staff (Berkeley: University of California)


Berkeley Buildings and Landmarks

STRUCTUREDATE COMPLETEDSIZE IN OUTSIDE GROSS SQ. FT., MATERIALSBUILDING COSTFINANCINGARCHITECTHISTORY
ADMINISTRATION BUILDINGSee SPROUL HALL.
AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY BUILDINGSee DECORATIVE ART BUILDING.
AGRICULTURE BUILDING188814,175 wood, brick basement$10,000$3,000 federal funds; $7,000 University fundsClinton DayBegun as brick “viticulture cellar”; establishment of Agricultural Experiment Stations by “Hatch Act” of Congress (1887) provided funds for addition of two floors and attic of wood; destroyed by fire April 17, 1897; basement served as foundation for Budd Hall.
AGRICULTURE BUILDINGSee BUDD HALL.
AGRICULTURE HALL191243,300 steel and granite$267,000Permanent Improvement Fund; state bond issueJohn Galen HowardOccupied by Dept. of Entomology and Parasitology and Entomology Library.
ALUMNI HOUSE195415,126 brick and concrete$375,000Gift: $200,173 California Alumni Assoc.; University fundsClarence W. Mayhew“A home on the campus” for alumni; equipped to accommodate large social gatherings or formal meetings; contains offices of California Alumni Association.
ANATOMY BUILDING (1907–1930); formerly METALLURGICAL LABORATORY (1885–1907)18858,350 wood$3,500Gift: Mrs. Phoebe Apperson HearstClinton DayOriginally machine shop for Dept. of Mining; upon completion of Hearst Memorial Mining Building (1907), remodeled for Dept. of Anatomy and University Printing Office; razed (1937) to clear site for Crocker Radiation Laboratory.
ANIMAL BEHAVIOR RESEARCH STATION196212,000 concrete$367,000Grant: National Science FoundationJ. Francis WardThirteen small buildings providing quarters for animals and research laboratories for joint studies in animal behavior by Depts. of Anthropology, Psychology, and Zoology.
ANTHROPOLOGICAL MUSEUM (1931–59); formerly MINING AND MECHANIC ARTS BUILDING (1879–1907); CIVIL ENGINEERING BUILDING (1907–31)187918,900 stone and brick$38,500State appropriationAlfred A. BennettRazed (1959) to clear site for Campbell Hall.
ANTHROPOLOGY BUILDING19049,600 corrugated iron$3,500Gift: Mrs. Phoebe Apperson HearstJohn Galen HowardHoused anthropological materials in the Hearst collections; razed (1953) to clear site for Hertz Hall.
ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS BUILDING; formerly GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS BUILDING (1929–61)19295,100$37,000University fundsW. P. StephensonIncludes addition, 1948.
ARCHITECTURE BUILDINGSee ENGINEERING RESEARCH SERVICES BUILDING.
ART BUILDINGSee NAVAL ARCHITECTURE BUILDING.
ART GALLERYSee UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY.
AUDITORIUM THEATER (STUDENT CENTER)1967 est.158,000 concrete$5,300,000University funds; fund raising campaignHardison and DeMarsAuditorium to seat 2,000; theater to seat 600; completes Student Center complex with 2,000–seat auditorium and 600–seat theater; includes space for future TV/FM radio facility.
BACON ART AND LIBRARY BUILDINGSee BACON HALL.
BACON HALL (1911–61); formerly BACON ART AND LIBRARY BUILDING (1881–1911)188129,000 brick and stone$77,000Gift: $25,000 Henry D. Bacon; state appropriationJohn A. RemerFirst library building; art gallery occupied third floor; library moved to new building (1911); remodeled, renamed, and occupied by Depts. of Geology and Geography; clock tower removed (1925) as earthquake hazard; included addition, 1902 (John Galen Howard, arch.); razed (1961) to clear site for Birge Hall; named for Henry Douglas Bacon, who donated his library plus half the funds for construction.
2401 BANCROFT WAY; formerly FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH (1898–1960)18984,094 woodA. C. SchweinfurthAcquired in 1960; church building retained; parish house and auxiliary structure razed (1965) to clear portion of site for auditorium theater.
BAND BUILDING19231,200 wood$2,000University fundsJohn Galen HowardROTC band room and quartermaster’s office during World War I; after the war, used by student bands until 1958, when incorporated into Dwinelle Annex group; included addition, 1949; razed (1964) to improve pedestrian circulation.
2 BARROW LANE (1958–64); formerly PRINTING OFFICE (1917–40); RECEIVING ROOM AND STORE HOUSE (1940–58)191710,000 concrete$27,500$26,000 Regent J. K. Moffitt (loan)John Galen HowardRazed (1964) to permit widening of entrance a Bancroft Way at Telegraph Avenue.
BARROWS HALL1964192,000 concrete$3,767,500State appropriationAleck L. Wilson & AssociatesFor Graduate School and School of Business Administration, Depts. of Political Science, Economics, and Sociology; named for General David P. Barrows, prof. of political science (1910–42), ninth President of University (1919–23).
BIOCHEMISTRY BUILDING196485,757 concrete$3,227,500State appropriation; National Science Foundation; National Institutes of HealthWurster, Bernardi & Emmons
BIOCHEMISTRY AND VIRUS LABORATORYSee MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND VIRUS LABORATORY.
BIRGE HALL196492,400 concrete$2,964,000State appropriationWarnecke & WarneckeFor physics; joined by glass–walled passageways to Le Conte Hall; named for Raymond T. Birge, prof. of physics, emeritus, chairman of dept. (1932–54).
BOALT HALLSee LAW BUILDING AND DURANT HALL.
BOTANICAL GARDENS192716,260 woodState appropriationOffice of Architects and EngineersSecond botanical gardens, eight greenhouses, three field buildings, and office building located in Strawberry Canyon; the first, maintained between 1892 and 1928, located in glade north of Doe library.
BOTANY BUILDING18989,940 wood$6,000State appropriationClinton DayFirst located on site of Stephens Hall; moved (1921) to southeast portion of campus near College Avenue; razed (1930) as fire hazard.
BOWLES HALL192973,700 concrete$354,000Gift: $265,000 Mrs. Phillip E. Bowles; University fundsGeorge W. KelhamFirst University–owned student residence hall (men), named for Phillip E. Bowles ’82, Regent (1911–22).
BUDD HALL (1908–30); formerly AGRICULTURE BUILDING (1897–1908)189720,737 wood$11,000State appropriationClinton DaySecond agricultural building replacing one burned April, 1897; named for Governor James H. Budd ’73 following his death in July, 1908; razed (1930) to clear site for Moses Hall.
BYERLY SEISMOGRAPHIC STATION19621,000 concrete$99,000U. S. Air ForceJohn A. Blume & AssociatesTunnel, equipped with geophysical instruments, extending 106 feet into side of Strawberry Canyon; named for Perry Byerly, prof. of seismology, emeritus, chairman of Dept. of Geological Sciences (1949–54) and director of Seismological Stations (1950–63).
CALIFORNIA FIELD1904231,300 (includes 85,100 sq. ft. in wood bleachers)$20,000$18,000 from ASUC; University fundsJohn Galen HowardFirst enclosed football field for University; seating for 17,000 spectators; bleachers razed (1925) to clear site for Hearst Gymnasium for Women and playing fields.
CALIFORNIA HALL190556,400 steel and granite$269,000$250,000 state appropriation; University fundsJohn Galen HowardAdministration building (1905–41); remodeled for Institute of Industrial Relations and classrooms
CALIFORNIA MEMORIAL STADIUM1923387,670 concrete; including field 106,000$1,021,500Fund raising campaignJohn Galen HowardDedicated to memory of University students who lost their lives in World War I; seats 77,000.
CALLAGHAN HALL194713,900 wood$20,000U. S. Veterans’ Educational Facilities ProgramMoved from Camp Shoemaker after World War II and occupied by offices of Naval ROTC; named for Admiral Daniel J. Callaghan, U.S.N., killed on bridge of "U.S.S. San Francisco" during battle of Solomon Islands.
CAMPANILESee SATHER TOWER.
CAMPBELL HALL195961,340 concrete$1,238,000State appropriationWarnecke & WarneckeOccupied by Depts. of Mathematics, Astronomy, Statistics, and Computer Center; named for William Wallace Campbell, director of Lick Observatory (1891–1930), President of University (1923–30).
CAMPUS CAFETERIASee INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS OFFICE.
CANYON POOLSee MEN’S SWIMMING POOL.
CHEMICAL BIODYNAMICS LABORATORY196337,392 concrete$1,253,000National Science Foundation; C. F. Kettering Foundation; National Institutes of Health; state appropriationMichael A. GoodmanFor scientists applying techniques of physics and chemistry to problems of biological evolution and photosynthesis.
CHEMISTRY ANNEX19155,500 wood$12,000University fundsJohn Galen HowardRazed (1963) to clear site for Hildebrand Hall.
CHEMISTRY AUDITORIUM19135,000 concrete$37,000Permanent Improvement FundJohn Galen HowardLecture hall especially equipped for instruction in chemistry; seating capacity of 500; razed (1959) to clear site for Latimer Hall.
CHEMISTRY BUILDING189143,180 brick$83,500University fundsClinton DayIncludes additions (1900, 1902, 1912); razed to clear site for Hildebrand Hall.
CHEMISTRY UNIT 2See HILDEBRAND HALL
CHRISTIE OVALSee EDWARDS FIELDS AND STADIUM. Named for Walter Christie, coach of track and field (1901–32).
CINDER TRACK188686,000 (includes 14,000 sq. ft. in wood bleachers)First formal athletic grounds; located immediately east of Eucalyptus Grove; site now covered by western portion of Life Sciences Building and parking lot; razed (1916) after completion of Running Track east of Barrow Lane.
CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING BUILDINGSee NAVAL ARCHITECTURE BUILDING.
CIVIL ENGINEERING BUILDINGSee ANTHROPOLOGICAL MUSEUM.
CIVIL ENGINEERING TESTING LABORATORYSee RADIATION LABORATORY.
CONSERVATORY18946,200 glass and steel$20,000University fundsLord & Burnham, Irving, N. Y."Plant house" for agricultural studies on north slope of central glade opposite Doe library; razed (1924) to clear area for Haviland Road.
CORPORATION YARD194037,600 six wooden buildings$85,000$35,000, State Fair Fund; $50,000, University Building ProgramArthur Brown, Jr.Maintenance shops and storehouses located at entrance to Strawberry Canyon, east of stadium; razed (1959) to clear site for Strawberry Canyon Recreation Area.
CORY HALL1950137,640 concrete$2,055,500State appropriation; University fundsCorlett & AndersonOccupied by Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Electronics Research Laboratory; named for Clarence L. Cory, prof. of electrical engineering (1892–1931), dean of College of Mechanics (1908–29); includes additions (1959, 1961).
COWELL MEMORIAL HOSPITAL1930108,398 concrete$450,000Gift: $250,000 Henry Cowell estate; state bond issueArthur Brown, Jr.Administered by Student Health Service.
Donner Pavilion1954$193,000Gift: Donner FoundationWeihe, Frick & KruseTwo–story addition to east wing for research in radiobiology under supervision of Donner Laboratory.
Addition1960$246,000Gift: Cowell FoundationE. Geoffrey BangsFour–story wing to north, increasing capacity of hospital to 100 beds.
CROCKER RADIATION LABORATORY19374,200 concrete$100,000 incl. 60"cyclotronGift: $75,000 from Regent William H. Crocker; University fundsGeorge W. KelhamFirst laboratory built specifically to house a cyclotron; atomic energy research conducted continuously until July, 1962 when cyclotron transferred to Davis; east portion of building razed (1962) to clear site for Physical Sciences Lecture Hall; west portion razed (1966) to improve campus landscape; named for William H. Crocker, Regent (1908–37).
CYCLOTRONSee separate article on LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORATORY––BERKELEY.
DAVIS HALL formerly ENGINEERING MATERIALS LABORATORY (1931–66)193160,700 concrete$690,000State bond issueGeorge W. KelhamFor Div. of Structural Engineering and Structural Mechanics and several related research laboratories named for Raymond E. Davis, prof. of engineering emeritus.
Addition1967 est.173,000 concrete$3,814,000State appropriationSkidmore, Owings & MerrillReplaces high bay (8,047 square feet) at south end of Engineering Materials Laboratory; under construction (1966).
DECORATIVE ART ANNEX (1930–64); formerly MUSEUM OF VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (1909–30)190912,700 corrugated iron$15,000Gift: $7,000, Miss Annie Alexander; Permanent Improvement FundJohn Galen HowardRazed (1964) to improve campus landscaping.
DECORATIVE ART BUILDING (1930–64); formerly FERTILIZER CONTROL BUILDING (1909–20), AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY BUILDING (1920–30)190911,800 wood$7,500Fees from fertilizer testsJohn Galen HowardRazed (1964) to improve campus landscaping.
DINING COMMONS (STUDENT CENTER)196048,300 concrete$1,272,000See STUDENT UNIONHardison and DeMarsIncludes Golden Bear Restaurant (seats 198 inside, 150 outside), cafeteria (seats 824 inside, 122 outside), and Terrace (seats 216 inside, 449 outside).
DOE MEMORIAL LIBRARY1917463,600 with annex; steel and granite$1,439,000Gift: $779,000 estate of Charles Franklin Doe; $525,000 state bond issueJohn Galen HowardMain library of Berkeley campus; partly completed 1911; for Charles Franklin Doe, who gave major portion of construction funds.
Annex1949$1,956,000Arthur Brown, Jr.
DONNER LABORATORY194244,640 concrete$650,000$465,000 International Cancer Research Foundation; $20,000 National Defense Research Committee; University fundsArthur Brown, Jr.Offices and laboratories for Div. of Medical Physics and research units cooperating with Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in biophysics, nuclear medicine, space biology; named for William H. Donner, then president of International Cancer Foundation (later called "The Donner Foundation"); includes addition, 1955 (Reynolds & Chamberlain, arch.).
DONNER PAVILIONSee COWELL MEMORIAL HOSPITAL.
DRAWING BUILDINGSee NAVAL ARCHITECTURE BUILDING.
DURANT HALL; formerly BOALT HALL OF LAW (1911–51)191124,300 steel and granite$163,500Gift: $100,000 Mrs. Elizabeth J. Boalt; $50,000 California lawyers subscriptionsJohn Galen HowardFirst a memorial to Judge John H. Boalt; School of Law and Boalt name moved to new location (1951); renamed for Rev. Henry Durant, first President of University (1870–72), and occupied by Dept. of Oriental Languages and East Asiatic Library.
DURANT HALLSee OPTOMETRY BUILDING
DWINELLE ANNEX; formerly MILITARY SCIENCE BUILDING (1920–33), MUSIC BUILDING (1933–58)19208,300 wood$18,000University fundsJohn Galen HowardDept. of Military Science moved to Harmon Gymnasium (1933); building remodeled for Dept. of Music; enlarged (1949) for Music Library; in 1958 renamed Dwinelle Annex and occupied by Depts. of Dramatic Arts, Comparative Literature; includes addition, 1949 (Michael A. Goodman, arch.).
DWINELLE HALL1952229,000 concrete$2,730,000State appropriation; University funds.Weihe, Frick & KruseClassrooms and faculty offices for Depts. of History, Speech, Classical and Modern Languages (except English); named in memory of John W. Dwinelle, trustee of College of California, state assemblyman responsible for writing and passage of "Organic Act" establishing University of California and member of its first Board of Regents (1868–74).
EARTH SCIENCES BUILDING1961121,974 concrete$2,437,000State appropriationWarnecke & WarneckeOffices, laboratories, and exhibit areas for Depts. of Geology and Geophysics, Geography, Paleontology, Museum of Paleontology, and Earth Sciences Library.
EAST HALL189829,400 wood$17,500State appropriationClinton DayDept. of Zoology laboratories and offices (1898–1930); first located on site of Le Conte Hall; moved (1921) to site of Morrison Hall; after 1930, used for storage, faculty offices; razed (1942) as fire hazard.
EDWARDS FIELDS AND STADIUM1932527,800 (including 450,300 fields) concrete$630,000$614,000 from ASUC; state appropriationWarren C. Perry and George W. KelhamAthletic fields named in memory of "Colonel" George C. Edwards ’73, prof. of mathematics (1874–1918); contains Walter Christie (track) Oval (bleachers seat 21,000) and Clint Evans Baseball Diamond (bleachers seat 3,000).
EMERGENCY CLASSROOM BUILDINGSee OPTOMETRY BUILDING.
ENGINEERING BUILDINGSee MCLAUGHLIN HALL.
ENGINEERING COURTYARD BUILDING196215,900 concrete$372,000State appropriationVan Bourg & NakamuraOne–story, underground laboratory occupied by units of Dept. of Civil Engineering.
ENGINEERING DESIGN BUILDINGSee NAVAL ARCHITECTURE BUILDING.
ENGINEERING MATERIALS LABORATORYSee DAVIS HALL.
ENGINEERING RESEARCH SERVICES BUILDING; formerly ARCHITECTURE BUILDING (1906–64)190622,300 wood and concrete$35,500Permanent Improvement FundJohn Galen HowardKnown to generations of students as "The Ark"; assigned to College of Engineering after College of Environmental Design moved to Wurster Hall (1964); includes additions (1908, 1912, 1936, 1952).
ENTOMOLOGY BUILDINGSee PURE FOOD AND DRUGS LABORATORY.
ESHLEMAN HALLSee MOSES HALL.
ESHLEMAN HALL (STUDENT CENTER)196548,840 concrete$1,157,000ASUC funds from sale of former publications bldg. to Regents; student feesHardison and DeMarsASUC office and publications building (except for "The Pelican") and Office of Intercollegiate Athletics; forms Bancroft Way boundary of Student Center quadrangle; named for John M. Eshleman ’02, former ASUC president and It. governor of California.
ETCHEVERRY HALL1964193,119 concrete$4,544,000State appropriationSkidmore, Owings & MerrillFor Depts. of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, and Division of Aeronautical Sciences; named for Bernard A. Etcheverry, prof. of irrigation and drainage (1915–51) and chairman of dept. (1923–51).
EVANS BASEBALL DIAMONDSee EDWARDS FIELDS AND STADIUM; named in 1965 for Clinton Evans ’12, baseball coach (1930–54).
EVANS HALL1967 est.180,000 concrete$5,924,000Gardner A. Dailey & AssociatesUnder construction (1966); named for Griffith C. Evans, prof. of mathematics, emeritus, and dept. chairman (1934–49).
FACULTY CLUB190332,100$487,500Initiation fees, life memberships, bond sales, Regents gifts, and loansBernard MaybeckClub (for men) organized 1902; antecedent Dining Association met in University cottage; new clubhouse incorporated cottage as dining room and kitchen; includes additions, 1903, 1904 (John Galen Howard, arch.), 1914, 1925 (Warren Perry, arch.), 1959 (Downs and Lagorio, arch.).
FERNWALD––SMYTH RESIDENCE HALLS 2939 Dwight Way
  • Lucy S. Mitchell Hall
  • Jessica B. Peixotto Hall
  • Esther E. Richards Hall
  • Margaret S. Oldenberg Hall
  • Smyth Halls (G, H, J)
  • Central dining hall
1946119,045 (8 bldgs.) wood$902,000Dormitory Construction FundW. H. RatcliffLiving quarters for 476 students, both men and women; located at head of Dwight Way on 9.7 acres of land willed University by William H. Smyth (1935), together with his home "Fernwald."
FERTILIZER CONTROL BUILDINGSee DECORATIVE ART BUILDING.
FORESTRY BUILDINGSee MULFORD HALL.
FORESTRY BUNGALOWSee MUSIC BUILDING.
FRESHMAN CHEMISTRY LABORATORY191515,100 concrete$28,500University fundsJohn Galen HowardRazed (1962) to clear site for Physical Sciences Lecture Hall.
2223 FULTON BUILDING192351,000 concrete$750,000 (purchase)State appropriationJames W. PlachekSix–story building purchased from U. S. Farm Bureau (1960); remodeled (Michael A. Goodman, arch.) and occupied by University of California Press (1962) and University Extension (1963).
GIANNINI HALL193081,300 concrete$500,000Gift: Bancitaly CorporationWilliam C. HaysThird building of a proposed agricultural quadrangle; tribute to Amadeo P. Giannini from Bancitaly Corporation through endowment of $1,500,000 to establish and house Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics.
GIAUQUE HALL formerly LOW TEMPERATURE LABORATORY (1954–66)195427,430 brick and concrete$793,000University fundsReynolds & ChamberlainFor research in properties of matter at temperatures approaching zero degrees; occupies court between Gilman Hall and Hildebrand Hall; one story above ground, two levels below ground; named for William F. Giauque, prof. of chemistry, emeritus, and Nobel Laureate.
GILL TRACT (Albany)
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE EXPERIMENTAL AREA 22 structures1940–196344,594 glassState appropriationH. ThomsenSuperintendent’s cottage, service bldg., storage bldg., bioclimatic chambers, insectary, laboratory–lath house, screenhouse 8 greenhouses, and 6 headhouses.
VIRUS LABORATORY GREENHOUSES 3 structures19597,264 glass, aluminum, and wood$106,000State appropriationHertzka & Knowles
USDA QUARANTINE FACILITY19634,600 glass, aluminum, and wood$119,000U. S. Dept. of AgricultureDonald S. Macky
UNIVERSITY VILLAGESee UNIVERSITY VILLAGE.
GILMAN HALL191744,700 concrete$205,053State bond issueJohn Galen HowardFor administrative offices of College of Chemistry and Dept. of Chemistry, instruction in physical chemistry and chemical engineering, and Chemistry Library until building of Latimer Hall; now occupied by Dept. of Chemical Engineering; named for Daniel Coit Gilman, second President of University, 1872–75.
GIRTON HALL19121,790 wood$4,782Gift: senior womenJulia MorganMeeting place for senior women, first located on Strawberry Canyon Road east of former upper College Avenue entrance; moved north of Cowell Hospital upon opening of Gayley Road (1946); named for Girton College, Cambridge, first college for women giving university work in England.
GREEK THEATRE190340,390 concrete$447,000Gift: William Randolph Hearst; Hearst FoundationJohn Galen HowardOutdoor theater seating 10,000, noted for excellent acoustics; scene of University ceremonial events, student bonfire rallies, dramatic and musical performances; named for William Randolph Hearst who donated construction funds. Includes addition 1957 (Ernest Born, arch.).
GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS BUILDINGSee ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS BUILDING.
GYMNASIUM FOR MENSee HARMON GYMNASIUM FOR MEN.
HAAS CLUBHOUSE195911,813 wood$350,500 including Stern PoolGift: $295,000 Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. Haas and Lucie Stern Trust; $50,000 RegentsWurster, Bernardi & EmmonsRecreational hall in Strawberry Canyon Recreational Area; named for Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. Haas, who donated major portion of construction funds.
HANDBALL COURTS196010,100 concrete$249,500State appropriationAnderson, Gee and WillerLocated underneath southeast corner of Edwards baseball field.
HARMON GYMNASIUM187921,200 wood$20,057Gift from A. K. P. Harmon; University fundsGymnasium, armory, and indoor auditorium for over 50 years; included additions (1886, 1897, 1900); razed (1933) as fire hazard after completion of new Harmon gymnasium; site utilized by south wing of Dwinelle Hall.
HARMON GYMNASIUM FOR MEN; formerly GYMNASIUM FOR MEN (1933–58)1933167,700 steel and concrete$727,500Gift: $485,000 from Ernest V. Cowell estate; $100,000 ASUC; state appropriationGeorge W. KelhamSeats 7,000 when used as auditorium; named for A. K. P. Harmon, donor of the first Harmon Gymnasium.
HAVILAND HALL192451,440 concrete$350,000Gift: $250,000 Mrs. Hannah N. Haviland; state appropriationJohn Galen HowardOccupied by School of Education and Lange Library of Education (1924–63); occupied by School of Social Welfare since 1963; named for Hannah H. Haviland, wife of San Francisco businessman, who donated construction funds.
HEARST GREEK THEATRESee GREEK THEATRE.
HEARST GYMNASIUM FOR WOMEN1927142,000 concrete$660,000Gift: William Randolph HearstBernard Maybeck and Julia MorganPresented by William Randolph Hearst in memory of his mother, Mrs. Phoebe Apperson Hearst.
HEARST HALL189819,410 wood$40,000Gift: Mrs. Phoebe Apperson HearstBernard MaybeckHall for large scale entertaining built by Mrs. P. A. Hearst next to her home on Piedmont Ave. and Channing Way; moved to lot on College Ave., north of Bancroft Way, remodeled as a gymnasium and social hall for women students, presented with land to University (1899); included addition, 1901; destroyed by fire, 1922; site now utilized by southern portion of Wurster Hall.
HEARST HALL SWIMMING POOLSee HYDRAULICS MODEL BASIN.
HEARST MEMORIAL MINING BUILDING1907105,000 steel and granite$1,065,000Gift: Mrs. Phoebe Apperson HearstJohn Galen HowardNamed for Senator George Hearst, member of the California Legislature (1865–66) and U. S. Senator (1866–91); includes court development, 1948 (Michael Goodman, arch.).
HEARST RANGE GREENHOUSES; 13 greenhouses, 2 glasshouses, 7 headhouses, lath house192545,800 glass, wood, and concrete$79,000Gift: $50,000 fund raising campaign; state appropriationJohn Galen HowardResearch area for College of Agriculture; includes addition, 1930, 1941 (Arthur Brown, Jr., arch.), 1950 (Office of Architects & Engineers, arch.), 1953 (Beals & Macky, arch.); buildings razed (1959–62) to clear sites for Tolman Hall and Biochemistry Building.
HEATING PLANT19309,000 concrete$58,500University fundsGeorge W. Kelham
HERTZ MEMORIAL HALL OF MUSIC195830,123 concrete$1,758,000 including Morrison HallGift: $200,000 from estate of Alfred Hertz; state appropriationGardner A. Dailey and AssociatesConcert hall seats 750; contains O’Neill Memorial Organ; connected by covered walkway with Morrison Hall; named for Alfred Hertz, conductor of San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, 1915–30.
HESSE HALL192483,759 concrete$1,152,000University fundsJohn Galen HowardOriginally a heat, power laboratory; now occupied by Hydraulic Engineering Laboratory, Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, faculty offices, Engineering Library; named for Frederick G. Hesse, prof. of mechanical engineering (1875–1904); includes additions, 1931 (George W. Kelham, arch.), 1947 (Corlett & Anderson, arch.), 1959 (Vanbourg & Nakamura, arch.).
HILDEBRAND HALL1966 est.131,360 concrete$4,605,000State appropriationAnshen & AllenResearch laboratories for study of inorganic chemistry, physical chemistry, and qualitative analysis; faculty offices and Chemistry Library; under construction (1966); named for Joel H. Hildebrand, prof of chemistry, emeritus, dean of men (1923–26) dean of the College of Letters and Science (1939–43) and College of Chemistry (1949–51), and chairman of the chemistry dept. (1941–43).
HILGARD HALL191770,800 concrete$375,000State bond issueJohn Galen HowardSecond building of agriculture group; occupied by Depts. of Plant Pathology, Soils and Plant Nutrition; named for Eugene W. Hilgard, first dean, College of Agriculture (1874–1904).
HOME ECONOMICS BUILDING19178,375 wood$17,500University fundsJohn Galen HowardFirst home economics building, located directly north of the former Mechanics Building; razed (1930) as fire hazard.
HOME ECONOMICS BUILDINGSee MORGAN HALL.
HORTON HALLSee TEMPORARY CLASSROOM AND OFFICE BUILDINGS, RESIDENTIAL, 2620 Bancroft Way.
HYDRAULICS MODEL BASIN (1934–55); formerly HEARST HALL SWIMMING POOL (1914–27)191510,000 concrete$11,500Gift: Mrs. Phoebe Apperson HearstJohn Galen HowardWomen’s swimming pool and athletic field which adjoined Hearst Hall on north; after burning of gymnasium (1922), area fenced, dressing rooms built, pool and field continued in use by women until new gymnasium built (1927); in 1934, with help of federal funds, pool converted into laboratory for research in erosion and tidal problems on beaches, harbors, rivers; razed (1955) after facility replaced at the Richmond Field Station.
HYGIENE AND PATHOLOGY LABORATORY190826,600 wood$21,000Permanent Improvement FundJohn Galen HowardQuarters for joint projects undertaken by Dept. of Hygiene and State Hygienic Laboratory; razed (1930) as fire hazard.
INSECTARY19538,490 wood$95,000State appropriationIra S. Beals and Donald S. MackyResearch unit of Division of Entomology and Acarology, located on Oxford Tract north of Hearst Ave. on Oxford St.
INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS OFFICE (1960–65); formerly CAMPUS CAFETERIA (1948–60)194831,800 wood$89,000University fundsU. S. Army EngineersFormer mess hall at Camp Parks, Alameda county during World War II; moved to campus (1947) for cafeteria; service moved to Student Union Dining Commons (1960); building occupied by Intercollegiate Athletic Offices, then razed (1965) to improve campus landscaping.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE1930243,300 concrete$1,750,000Gift: John D. Rockefeller, Jr.George W. KelhamResidence hall and social meeting place for foreign and American students; one of four such houses in the world; occupied by Navy V–12 units during World War II and called Callaghan Hall; returned to University September, 1946.
JONES CHILD STUDY CENTER; 2425 Atherton Street19609,620 wood$205,000State appropriationJoseph EsherickUnit of Institute of Human Development, housing University nursery school; named for Harold E. Jones, prof. of psychology (1927–60), director of Institute of Human Development (1935–60).
KEPLER COTTAGESSee STUDENT COTTAGES.
KLEEBERGER INTRAMURAL PLAYING FIELD194174,000$73,000University fundsWalter T. SteilbergFenced field north of California Memorial Stadium; named for Frank L. Kleeberger, prof. of physical education (1913–42).
KROEBER HALL1959112,948 concrete$2,155,000State appropriationGardner A. DaileyTwo units (Lowie Museum of Anthropology and Worth Ryder Art Gallery) open to public: contains Dept. of Anthropology, Dept. of Art, Archaeological Research Facility, Art and Anthropology Library; named for Alfred L. Kroeber, prof. of anthropology, emeritus, chairman of dept. (1901–46).
LATIMER HALL1963185,420 concrete$6,282,000State appropriationAnshen & AllenFor offices of College of Chemistry, Dept. of Chemistry, classes in organic chemistry, freshman chemistry, and (temporarily) Chemistry Library; named for Wendell M. Latimer, prof. of chemistry (1919–55), dean of College of Chemistry (1942–49).
LAW BUILDING1951204,133 concrete$1,740,500Gifts: $758,267 Garret W. McEnerney bequest; $126,732 Kavanagh bequest; Boalt estate; state appropriationWarren C. PerrySchool of Law transferred from former Boalt Hall (1951); Boalt name also transferred and applied to classroom wing of new buildings; other wing named Garret W. McEnerney Law Library; includes addition, 1959.
LAW COMPLEX1966 est.80,446 concrete$2,460,000Wurster, Bernardi & EmmonsUnder construction.
LAW SCHOOL ADDITIONState appropriationFor additional library space, classroom seating for 100, 23 faculty offices.
EARL WARREN LEGAL CENTERGifts: law school alumni; other donorsProvides auditorium seating 500, research and conference rooms; named for U. S. Chief Justice Earl Warren ’12.
MANVILLE HALLGifts: $500,000 Countess Folke Bernadotte and H. E. Manville, Jr.; $350,000 Garret McEnerney Estate; $600,000 law school alumniSeven–story residence hall for law students; named for Hiram Edward Manville, former president of Johns–Manville Corporation.
LAWRENCE HALL OF SCIENCE1966 est.111,550 concrete$4,680,000Gifts: private donors, scientific corporations, other institutionsAnshen & AllenEducational center to inform public about science; named for Ernest O. Lawrence, prof. of physics (1928–58), first director of Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (1936–58), and Nobel Laureate; under construction.
LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORATORYSee separate article on LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORATORY.
LE CONTE HALL1924164,150 concrete$1,676,500State appropriation; National Science Foundation grantJohn Galen HowardFor Dept. of Physics; named for John Le Conte, prof. of physics (1876–81), third President of University (1881–85), and Joseph Le Conte, prof. of geology and natural science (1868–1901); includes additions, 1950 (Miller & Warnecke, arch.), 1964 (John Carl Warnecke & Associates, arch.).
LEUSCHNER OBSERVATORY; formerly STUDENTS’ OBSERVATORY (1886–1951) 9 structures18869,312 wood$10,000State appropriationClinton DayEquipped with 20–inch reflecting telescope and other instruments for student instruction in astronomy; named for Armin O. Leuschner, director of observatory (1898–1938).
LEWIS HALL194857,600 concrete$1,132,500State appropriationE. Geoffrey BangsAssigned to analytic, inorganic, and microchemistry; named for Gilbert N. Lewis, prof. of chemistry (1912–45), dean of College of Chemistry (1912–41).
LIBRARY ANNEXSee DOE MEMORIAL LIBRARY.
LIFE SCIENCES BUILDING1930376,333 concrete$1,186,000$40,000 WPA; state bond issueGeorge W. KelhamOne of largest academic structures in U. S.; contains laboratories, classrooms for Depts. of Anatomy, Botany, Bacteriology, Physiology, Psychology (to 1962), Zoology; also houses Biology Library, herbaria, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, and (to 1964) Bio–Organic Laboratory.
LOW TEMPERATURE LABORATORYSee GIAUQUE HALL.
LOWIE MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGYSee KROEBER HALL.
MANVILLE HALLSee LAW COMPLEX.
MCLAUGHLIN HALL formerly ENGINEERING BUILDING (1906–66)193151,400 concrete$379,500State bond issueGeorge W. KelhamUsed for administrative offices of College of Engineering, department offices, laboratories of Depts. of Civil and Mechanical Engineering; named for Donald H. McLaughlin, Regent (1950–66).
MECHANIC ARTS LABORATORYSee RADIATION LABORATORY.
MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING BUILDINGSee MECHANICS BUILDING.
MECHANICS ANNEX191814,400 woodU. S. GovernmentU. S. EngineersErected by federal government during World War I for School of Military Aeronautics; purchased by University and occupied by U. S. Shipping Board School (1919–21); used by Depts. of Marine Engineering, Naval Architecture, and Radio Engineering (1921–26); razed (1926).
MECHANICS BUILDING (1931–65); formerly MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING BUILDING 1893–1931)189341,600 brick$63,000University fundsWilliam CurlettFor offices, laboratories of Dept. of Mechanical Engineering (1893–1964); razed (1965) to clear site for DAVIS HALL addition.
MEN’S SWIMMING POOL191117,632 concrete$15,000Gymnasium feesCharles G. Hyde, prof. of sanitary engineeringLocated in Strawberry Canyon; restricted to men students and faculty until 1943, then opened to all students; maintenance difficulty caused abandonment in 1951.
METALLURGICAL LABORATORYSee ANATOMY BUILDING.
MILITARY SCIENCE BUILDINGSee DWINELLE ANNEX.
MINING AND MECHANIC ARTS BUILDINGSee ANTHROPOLOGICAL MUSEUM.
MOFFITT UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARY1968 est.120,000 concrete$2,997,000State appropriationJohn Carl Warnecke & AssociatesFive–story library (two floors underground) for undergraduate students; named for James K. Moffitt ’86, Regent (1911–48), lifelong benefactor of University Library; funded.
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND VIRUS LABORATORY; formerly BIOCHEMISTRY AND VIRUS LABORATORY (1952–63)195263,040 concrete$1,231,500State appropriationMichael A. GoodmanResearch organization established (1948) to conduct studies on biochemical and biological properties of animal, bacterial, plant viruses.
MORGAN HALL; formerly HOME ECONOMICS BUILDING (1953–62)195356,300 concrete$1,061,000State appropriationSpencer & AmbroseFor Dept. of Nutritional Sciences laboratories, classrooms; named for Mrs. Agnes Fay Morgan, prof. of nutrition, emeritus, chairman of Dept. of Home Economics and Nutrition (1915–64).
MORRISON HALL195840,357 concrete$1,758,000 including Hertz HallGift: Mrs. May T. Morrison; state appropriationGardner A. Dailey and AssociatesFor Dept. of Music, Music Library; connected by covered walkway with Hertz Memorial Hall of Music; named for Mrs. May T. Morrison, benefactor to the University.
MOSES HALL; formerly ESHLEMAN HALL (1931–64)193146,100 concrete$210,000Gift: $125,000 ASUC; state appropriationGeorge W. KelhamOriginally a publications building for "Daily Californian" and student magazines owned by ASUC; sold (1959) to Regents to provide portion of funds for new student office building; remodeled (1965) for Institute of Governmental Studies; renamed for Bernard Moses, prof. of history (1878–1911).
MULFORD HALL; formerly FORESTRY BUILDING (1948–56)194870,600 concrete$910,000State appropriationMiller & WarneckeFor School of Forestry and Wildlife Research Center; also accommodates Forestry Library and Dept. of Genetics; named for Walter Mulford, first prof. of forestry (1914–48), first dean of School of Forestry (1947–48).
MUSIC BUILDING (1917–30) formerly FORESTRY BUNGALOW (1915–17)191511,000 wood$1,000University fundsJohn Galen HowardPortable building bought in San Francisco and placed on north edge of campus behind Hearst Memorial Mining Building for forestry students; later housed Dept. of Music; razed (1930) as fire hazard.
MUSIC BUILDINGSee DWINELLE ANNEX.
NAVAL ARCHITECTURE BUILDING formerly DRAWING BUILDING (1914–24), ART BUILDING (1924–30), ENGINEERING DESIGN BUILDING (1930–51), CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING BUILDING (1951–64); HYDRAULICS AND NAVAL ARCHITECTURE BUILDING (1964–65)191410,900 wood$17,500Permanent Improvement FundJohn Galen HowardDept. of City and Regional Planning moved to Wurster Hall (1964); building assigned to College of Engineering.
NORTH HALL187329,880 wood and concrete$99,500State appropriationDavid FarquharsonSecond of two original buildings; cornerstone laid May 3, 1873; humanities building also housing social sciences, mathematics, engineering (to 1879), offices of President and recorder (to 1898); basement devoted to student activities; upper floors razed (1917) as fire hazard; basement floor roofed and continued in use for student store and ASUC offices (to 1923); used for offices of Dept. of Naval Science (to 1931); razed (1931); site now occupied by Doe Memorial Library.
OPTOMETRY BUILDING; formerly EMERGENCY CLASSROOM BUILDING (1941–42), DURANT HALL (1942–50)194122,600 concrete$140,000State fair fundsArthur Brown, Jr.First occupied by mathematics, journalism, and "defense" courses conducted with U. S. funds; during development of atomic bomb, building cleared and used as auxiliary unit of Radiation Laboratory; reoccupied (1946) by mathematics, journalism, naval science, and some optometry courses; remodeled (1953) for exclusive use of School of Optometry.
OXFORD RESEARCH UNIT196083,321 glass, wood, and concrete$1,054,000State appropriationDonald S. MackyLaboratories, greenhouses, open ground plots for agricultural research projects on Oxford Tract, north of Hearst Ave. on Oxford St.; includes addition, 1962.
PARKING STRUCTURES
A. (Hearst and Scenic)1967 est.185,020 concrete$1,195,000Loan fundsAnshen & AllenThree–level parking, tennis courts above; funded.
B. (Bancroft Way by Kroeber Hall)196077,376 concrete$176,500Loan fundsGarner A. Dailey and AssociatesGround level parking, tennis courts above.
C. (Channing and Ellsworth)1961125,200 concrete$326,500Loan fundsDonald L. Hardison and AssociatesGround level parking, tennis courts above.
D. (College and Channing)1962250,000 concrete$1,187,500Loan fundsAnshen & AllenTwo–level parking, Underhill Field above.
University Hall (Oxford and Addison)196086,000 concrete$379,000Loan fundsAnshen & AllenThree–level parking.
Student Center196021,120 concrete$238,000Student Union fundsHardison and DeMarsUnder Student Union plaza.
PELICAN BUILDING19572,470 concrete$90,000Gift: Earle C. Anthony ’03Joseph EsherickGift for use of "Pelican" (student humor magazine) staff from its first editor.
PHILOSOPHY BUILDINGSee PSYCHOLOGY BUILDING.
PHYSICAL SCIENCES LECTURE HALL196414,300 brick and concrete$599,500State appropriationAnshen & AllenAdjoins Latimer Hall on north; revolving, three–part stage permits continuous use of auditorium seating 550.
POULTRY HUSBANDRY LABORATORY 24 structures192840,330 wood$80,000Permanent Improvement FundJohn Galen HowardSuperintendent’s cottage, laboratory, chicken houses, brooder house, barns, storage buildings located on north side of Strawberry Canyon one–quarter mile east of stadium.
POWER HOUSESee UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY.
PRESIDENT’S HOUSESee UNIVERSITY HOUSE.
PRINTING DEPARTMENTSee UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRINTING DEPARTMENT.
PRINTING OFFICESee 2 BARROW LANE.
PSYCHOLOGY BUILDING (1921–30); formerly PHILOSOPHY BUILDING (1898–1921)18983,225 wood$8,000State appropriationClinton DayFirst located on main campus road near head of glade opposite Doe Library; moved (1916) to north edge of campus at Hearst Ave. and La Loma; razed (1930) as fire hazard.
PURE FOOD AND DRUGS LABORATORY (1912–33); formerly ENTOMOLOGY BUILDING (1905–12)19051,200 woodAddition to first Harmon Gymnasium detached and moved 50 feet eastward (1905), remodeled (John Galen Howard, arch.) and occupied by Dept. of Entomology (1912); later used by State Pure Food and Drugs Laboratory; razed (1933) with Harmon Gymnasium.
RADIATION LABORATORY (1931–59); formerly MECHANIC ARTS LABORATORY (1885–1907), CIVIL ENGINEERING TESTING LABORATORY (1907–31)188516,200 wood$3,500State appropriationProf. Frederick G. HesseOriginally machine shop for College of Mechanics, then used by College of Civil Engineering; remodeled (1931) for research in atomic energy; named "Radiation Laboratory" and later known as "old" radiation laboratory after development of Lawrence Radiation Laboratory on "the hill"; included addition, 1911 (John Galen Howard, arch.); razed (1959) to clear site for Latimer Hall.
RECEIVING ROOM AND STOREHOUSESee 2 BARROW LANE.
RESIDENCE HALLS Unit 1 (2650 Durant Ave.)
  • May L. Cheney Hall
  • Mary C. Freeborn Hall
  • Monroe E. Deutsch Hall
  • Thomas M. Putnam Hall
1960209,682 concrete$8,336,000 (Units 1–2)Housing and Home Finance Agency loans; University fundsWarnecke & WarneckeNine–story halls accommodating 210 students each; within each unit, two halls are occupied by women students, two by men students; all halls named for members of the University "family" particularly concerned with student housing.
Unit 2 (2650 Haste St.)
  • Mary B. Davidson Hall
  • Ruby L. Cunningham Hall
  • Farnham Griffiths Hall
  • Sidney M. Ehrman Hall
1960209,682 concreteSee Unit 1Housing and Home Finance Agency loans; University fundsWarnecke & Warnecke
Unit 3 (2400 Durant Ave.)
  • Ida W. Sproul Hall
  • Sally McKee Spens–Black Hall
  • Herbert I. and Kenneth Priestley Hall
  • William J. Norton Hall
1964223,328 concrete$4,614,500Gift: $550,000 Mrs. Spens–Black; Housing and Home Finance Agency loans; University fundsJohn Carl Warnecke & Associates
RUNNING TRACK1915172,000 (including 40,000 sq. ft. in wood bleachers)$20,000ASUC fundsJohn Galen HowardCinder track with bleachers immediately west of California Field; removed upon completion of Edwards Field (1932); site partially occupied by Barrows Hall.
SATHER GATE and bridge19135,000 concrete, granite, and bronze$36,000 (gate) $9,000 (bridge)Gift: $40,000 Mrs. Jane K. Sather; Permanent Improvement FundJohn Galen HowardMemorial to Peder Sather, San Francisco banker and trustee of College of California.
SATHER TOWER ("Campanile")19148,600 steel and granite$250,000Gift: $200,000 Mrs. Jane K. Sather; Permanent Improvement FundJohn Galen HowardMemorial to Mrs. Jane K. Sather; widely known landmark, nicknamed for its resemblance to St. Mark’s Campanile in Venice, Italy; chimes (12 bronze bells) cast by John Taylor and Sons, Loughborough, England; delivery delayed by World War I; first played Nov. 2, 1917; tower and chimes dedicated Charter Day, 1918.
SCHOOL OF LAWSee LAW BUILDING.
SCHOOL OF OPTOMETRYSee OPTOMETRY BUILDING.
SENIOR MEN’S HALL19062,940 redwood logs$4,500Gift: Order of the Golden BearJohn Galen HowardMeeting place originally restricted to senior men; later opened to all student organizations.
SENIOR WOMEN’S HALLSee GIRTON HALL.
SERVICE BUILDINGSSee CORPORATION YARD.
SERVICE BUILDINGS (1915–39)1915woodPermanent Improvement FundJohn Galen HowardSix Buildings (maintenance shops, barn, office of superintendent of grounds and buildings) on Barrow Lane; razed (1939) to clear site for Sproul Hall; operations moved to corporation yard, Strawberry Canyon.
SERVICES BUILDING 2000 Carleton St.1958111,683 concrete$1,333,000State appropriationJohn Lyon Reid & AssociatesReplaced Corporation Yard in Strawberry Canyon.
SMYTH–FERNWALD RESIDENCE HALLSSee FERNWALD–SMYTH RESIDENCE HALLS.
SOCIAL WELFARE BUILDING 2400 Allston Way19224,900 concrete$21,000 (purchase price)University fundsWilliam C. HaysPurchased (1938) with land from Pacific Unitarian School of Religion; occupied by School of Social Welfare (to 1952); razed (1953) to clear site for Alumni House.
SOUTH HALL187329,500 brick and stone$197,000State appropriationDavid FarquharsonFirst of two original buildings; cornerstone laid Oct. 9, 1872; fire–resistant building for laboratories of agriculture, physical and natural sciences; also housed library (to 1881) and office of secretary to Regents (to 1906); Offices of the President 1899–1906; continued in use for science, later mainly physics (to 1924); remodeled for Depts. of Political Science, Economics, Business Administration, and Sociology (to 1964).
SOUTH HALL ANNEX19132,400 concrete$6,000University fundsJohn Galen HowardOne–story shop for Dept. of Physics (1913–23); later used for offices and meeting rooms of student honorary societies (1923–36), Student and Alumni Placement Center.
SPACE SCIENCES LABORATORY196645,500 concrete$1,597,000National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationAnshen & AllenInterdisciplinary laboratory for basic research in physical, engineering, and biological problems in exploration of space.
SPRECKELS ART BUILDING (1930–55); formerly SPRECKELS PHYSIOLOGICAL LABORATORY (1903–30)190315,300 wood$29,000Gift: Rudolph SpreckelsJohn Galen HowardOne of first campus laboratories intended primarily for research; named for Rudolph Spreckels, donor of the building; Dept. of Physiology moved to Life Sciences Bldg. (1930); laboratory remodeled for Dept. of Art and renamed; razed (1955) to clear site for Morrison Hall.
SPRECKELS PHYSIOLOGICAL LABORATORYSee SPRECKELS ART BUILDING.
SPRINGER MEMORIAL GATEWAY1964brick and concrete$81,000Gift: Russell S. Springer ’03Thomas D. ChurchWest entrance to campus off Oxford St. between University Ave., Center St.
SPROUL HALL; formerly ADMINISTRATION BUILDING (1941–58)1941124,700 steel, concrete, with granite facing$811,000University Building ProgramArthur Brown, Jr.Campus administration building since 1958; previous to completion of University Hall, both University–wide and campus offices shared building; named for Robert Gordon Sproul ’13, 11th President of University (1930–58).
STEPHENS HALL; formerly STEPHENS MEMORIAL UNION (1923–61)192376,600 concrete$310,000Gifts: $175,000 ASUC; $225,000 fund raising campaignJohn Galen HowardFirst student union, built in memory of Henry Morse Stephens, prof. of history (1902–19); sold to Regents by ASUC (1959) to provide portion of funds for new union; renamed (1964) and occupied by Kelsen Graduate Social Sciences Library and social science research units.
STEPHENS MEMORIAL UNIONSee STEPHENS HALL.
STERN HALL194265,392 concrete$480,500Gift: $250,000 Mrs. Rosalie Stern; University Building ProgramCorbett & McMurray and W. W. WursterFirst University–owned residence hall for women; situated on east side of Gayley Road near Founders’ Rock; includes addition, 1959 (Wurster, Bernardi & Emmons, arch.); named for Sigmund Stern ’79, San Francisco businessman and benefactor to the University
STRAWBERRY CANYON RECREATIONAL FACILITIES195911,813 concrete$350,500Gifts: Lucie Stern estate; Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. HaasWurster, Bernardi & EmmonsIncludes Haas Clubhouse, Stern Pool, and athletic field in Strawberry Canyon east of California Memorial Stadium.
STUDENT CENTERSee AUDITORIUM THEATER DINING COMMONS ESHLEMAN HALL STUDENT UNION
STUDENT COTTAGES ("KEPLER COTTAGES")187419,512 wood$27,000University fundsDavid FarquharsonOne–story, eight–room cottages; six located south of eucalyptus grove, two near Faculty Club; one of latter burned, other incorporated into Faculty Club as kitchen; cottages near eucalyptus grove razed (1932) to clear portion of site for Edwards Field.
STUDENT UNION (STUDENT CENTER)1961171,700 concrete$3,729,500Gifts: $1,000,000 Regent Edwin W. Pauley; $100,000 Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Tilden, Jr.; $2,385,000 alumni contributions; ASUC funds from sale of Stephens Union; $800,000 state appropriation; Housing and Home Finance Agency loanHardison and DeMarsBuilding operated by the ASUC and houses ASUC store, bowling lanes, barber shop, art activities center, game rooms, meditation room, ballroom, meeting rooms, lounges, coffee shop (Bear’s Lair, seats 306 inside, 142 outside), box office, and the offices of elected and employed officers of the ASUC.
STUDENTS’ INFIRMARY190719,750 wood$22,500University fundsFormer residence, 2220 College Ave., converted to use of Students’ Health Service; included additions, 1912, 1913, 1914; razed (1930) after completion of Cowell Hospital.
STUDENTS’ OBSERVATORYSee LEUSCHNER OBSERVATORY.
"T" (temporary) BUILDINGS
a) wooden1946–1948231,800$205,500U. S., state veterans’ fundsThirty–eight one– and two–story barracks from deactivated World War II Navy camps, moved and established by U. S. Veterans’ Educational Facilities Program; ten buildings placed in glade opposite Doe Memorial Library, remainder in unoccupied spots about the campus; used for faculty offices, classrooms, architectural and engineering laboratories, Veterans’ Administration offices, Counseling Service, and Housing Office; most buildings razed since 1950 to clear sites for permanent buildings and improve campus landscaping.
b) galvanized iron194812,100$165,000U. S. Federal Works AdministrationClifford WolfeSeven buildings on Gayley Road originally assigned to Cowell Hospital for ward wings; razed (1963–1968 est.).
TEMPORARY CLASSROOM AND OFFICE BUILDINGS (Residential)Buildings on land acquired for campus expansion and used temporarily for offices.
2220 Bancroft Way900 woodOccupied by custodian supervisor.
2620 Bancroft Way (Horton Hall)12,440 woodOccupied by Housing Office, Committee for Arts and Lectures.
2536–2538 Channing Way (formerly Anna Head School)39,538 woodOccupied by Institute of International Studies, Brazil Overseas Program, undergraduate scholarships.
2241–2243 College Ave.4,800 woodOccupied by Institute of Human Learning.
2251 College Ave.12,340 woodOccupied by Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science.
2220 Piedmont Ave.10,900 woodOccupied by Survey Research Center.
2222 Piedmont Ave.4,000 woodOccupied by Institute of Social Sciences, Mechanolinguistics.
2224 Piedmont Ave.6,900 woodOccupied by Center for Law and Society.
2232 Piedmont Ave.5,800 woodOccupied by Elementary School Science Project, anthropology classrooms.
2234 Piedmont Ave.4,100 woodOccupied by Institute of International Studies.
2240 Piedmont Ave.7,900 woodOccupied by Institute of Personality Assessment.
TOLMAN HALL1962228,000 concrete$5,500,000State appropriationGardner A. Dailey and AssociatesFor School of Education, Department of Psychology, Institute of Human Development (formerly the Institute of Child Welfare), Center for the Study of Higher Education, and Education––Psychology Library; named for Edward C. Tolman, prof. of psychology (1918–50).
UNDERHILL FIELD196293,492 concreteSee PARKING STRUCTURE DPlaying field above Parking Structure "D," College Ave. and Channing Way; named for Robert M. Underhill, vice–president, emeritus, and secretary and treasurer of Regents, emeritus.
UNITARIAN CHURCHSee 2401 BANCROFT WAY.
UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY; formerly POWER HOUSE (1904–31)19045,400 brick$62,500Permanent Improvement fundJohn Galen HowardPower plant relocated (1931) and building converted (W. P. Stephenson, arch.) to present function.
UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM1968 est.83,000 concrete$3,000,000Gift: $250,000 Hans Hofmann; fund raising campaign; University fundsMario J. CiampiFor art museum, Hans Hofmann Art Gallery, Art Library, workshop theater, conference suite, music rooms.
UNIVERSITY EXTENSIONSee 2223 FULTON BUILDING.
UNIVERSITY EXTENSION BUILDING 2441 Bancroft Way48,950 concrete$73,500State Fair; University FundsOriginally the Ambassador Apts. and Drake’s Restaurant; purchased (1943) and partially converted to offices and work rooms for University Extension; razed (1963) to clear site for present Eshleman Hall.
UNIVERSITY GARAGE194114,000 brick$18,000
UNIVERSITY HALL1959151,590 concrete$3,305,000State appropriationWelton Becket & AssociatesUniversity–wide administration building.
UNIVERSITY HOUSE; formerly PRESIDENT’S HOUSE (1911–58)191120,000 steel and granite$215,000State appropriationAlbert A. PissisFirst building begun under the Benard Architectural Plan; ground broken by Mrs. Hearst on May 12, 1900; occupied by Presidents of University (1911–58), by Chancellor Heyns (1965–).
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESSSee 2223 FULTON BUILDING.
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRINTING DEPARTMENT; formerly UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS (1940–62)194045,818 concrete$250,000$146,220 WPA; University fundsMasten & HurdUniversity of California Press formerly performed both publishing and printing functions under one manager; divided (1950) into "Publishing Dept." and "Printing Dept." under separate managers, both continuing to occupy the same building; in 1960, title "University of California Press" given to publishing department and in August, 1962, its offices moved to 2223 Fulton Building; printing department remained in original building.
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE (Gill Tract)University–owned housing for married students located on Gill Tract, three miles north of Berkeley.
VETERANS VILLAGE194265,664 woodNineteen buildings (126 units) from Oregon war–housing project, purchased by University (1949) and brought to Gill Tract; removed (1959) and land returned to College of Agriculture.
KULA–GULF AND CODORNICES VILLAGE1942279,246 woodFifty–four buildings (420 units) built by Federal Housing Authority in World War II on leased Gill Tract land; buildings purchased by University in 1956.
MARRIED STUDENT HOUSING1962328,772 wood$3,800,000Housing and Home Finance Agency loan; state fundsWurster, Bernardi & EmmonsFifty buildings (500 units) built by University.
VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY MUSEUM OFSee DECORATIVE ART ANNEX.
VETERINARY SCIENCE BUILDINGS192413,620 wood$10,000University fundsJohn Galen HowardLaboratory on north side of Strawberry Canyon, east of California Memorial Stadium; included animal houses and barn, 1931; most buildings razed (1959) to clear site for Strawberry Canyon Recreational Facilities.
WARREN HALL195573,900 concrete and brick$1,500,000State appropriationMasten & HurdFor School of Public Health, Public Health Library, Cancer Research Genetics Laboratory; named for U. S. Chief Justice Earl Warren ’12.
WARREN LEGAL CENTERSee LAW COMPLEX.
WHEELER HALL1917119,000 steel and granite$715,994State bond issueJohn Galen HowardClassrooms for humanities and social sciences; faculty offices on top floor; large auditorium seating over 900; named for Benjamin Ide Wheeler, eighth President of University (1899–1919); first building to be named for living person––not a donor.
WOMEN’S FACULTY CLUB192315,126 wood$65,000Members’ bond issueJohn Galen HowardContains living rooms, lounge, dining rooms; located on Strawberry Creek, east of Senior Men’s Hall and Faculty Club.
WURSTER HALL1964215,800 concrete$4,860,500State appropriationDeMars, Esherick and OlsenFor College of Environmental Design; named for William W. Wurster, prof. of architecture, emeritus, dean of College of Environmental Design, emeritus, and the late Mrs. Catherine Bauer Wurster, lecturer in city and regional planning.

[Map] Berkeley Campus 1965

[Map] Berkeley Campus 1897


Note: Once a stand–alone page on the U.C. Berkeley website, Berkeley Buildings and Landmarks is now available only in a frames format within The Centennial Record of the University of California. It is republished here as a stand–alone page for the convenience of architectural and historical researchers.