Events Calendar


BAHA Events


Order your tickets now!

A Maybeck Afternoon on the Hill

with Family Members, Maybeck Homes,
and the Maybecks’ 1929 Packard


Jacomena Maybeck and her twin daughters, 1931

Sunday, 7 August 2016
2 pm ~ 4 pm
$40, advance purchase only

In the late 1920s, Bernard Maybeck’s most prominent client was Earle C. Anthony (1880–1961), a pioneer of broadcasting, gas stations, and bus lines, as well as the Packard distributor for all of California. Maybeck designed opulent Packard showrooms in San Francisco, Oakland, and Los Angeles, as well as Anthony’s famed Los Feliz estate.

In partial payment for architectural services, Anthony had a special-order Packard 640 Dual Cowl Phaeton made for Maybeck. This luxurious and magnificently restored car, one of only three in existence, has its home-base outside California and will be brought to Berkeley for one day only, to serve as the centerpiece of the Maybeck Afternoon reception and open house.

Two of the Maybeck family homes and a third iconic Maybeck-designed house will be open. Light refreshments will be served in a garden.

Capacity is limited to 75 participants! Order your tickets now! Ticket buyers will be notified of the location.

Order tickets online or send a check, made payable to BAHA, to P.O. Box 1137, Berkeley, CA 94701.


The Maybeck Packard (photo courtesy of Bill Jabs)

Co-sponsored by BAHA and the Maybeck Foundation

Call for volunteers

Would you like to attend the event free of charge? Volunteer for 1.5 hours as a docent or refreshment helper, and have half the event’s time free to enjoy the Maybeck Afternoon.

Interested? Please e-mail BAHA, giving your phone number, and indicate whether you prefer to work the 1:30–3:00 shift or the 3:00–4:30 shift.


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Other Events




Yosemite Museum, designed by Herbert Maier (National Park Service)

The Hillside Club Round Table presents

A New Deal for the Arts & Crafts: Herbert Maier and the California Boys in the National and State Parks

An illustrated lecture by Gray Brechin

Wednesday, 24 August 2016
7:30 pm
The Hillside Club
2286 Cedar Street, Berkeley

Donation requested; BHC members free

Now celebrating its centennial, the National Park Service was largely created by graduates of the University of California at Berkeley. Among its most important early designers was architect Herbert Maier, who transmitted the Arts and Crafts ethos and aesthetic so prevalent in the town in 1916 to the myriad of rustic structures built by the Civilian Conservation Corps twenty years later.


Herbert Maier

For additional information about the Hillside Club Round Table, see the club’s website.


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An early, unrealized design for the El Cerrito BART station by Vernon DeMars (Vernon DeMars Collection, U.C. Berkeley Environmental Design Archives)

When Architects and Artists had Big Dreams for BART

Wednesday, 24 August 2016
7:00 pm
El Cerrito Community Center
7007 Moeser Lane, El Cerrito

Free admission

Back in the mid-1960s, planners envisioned a rapid transit system that would link the entire Bay Area, with stations in Napa, Fairfield, Santa Rosa, Brentwood, Livermore, Campbell, San Jose, and Los Altos, among other spots. Every station was to have art. BART’s architects hoped that the new system would not only provide transportation but aid in “controlling and directing future urban growth and development, and [...] upgrading economically and physically depressed and stagnant sections of the urban complex.”

What happened to BART’s art and architecture, and to these dreams?

Writer Dave Weinstein will discuss BART’s original artistic and architectural plans. Jennifer Easton, BART’s art program manager, will discuss current plans for art on BART.

Sponsored by the El Cerrito Historical Society. Wheelchair accessible. Light refreshments.

Information: Dave Weinstein, (510) 524-1737, davidsweinstein@yahoo.com


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Berkeley! How We Got Our Name

17 April – 24 September 2016
Berkeley History Center
Veterans Memorial Building
1931 Center Street
Berkeley

In 1866, the private College of California, predecessor to the University of California, was getting ready to subdivide and sell some of the land it owned north of Oakland and south of the college site to help pay for building a campus. The college trustees knew that a name was needed if they were to sell home sites. They had turned to Frederick Law Olmsted for guidance. Would we have been better off living in Shelterdue, Havensholme, or even Billingsgate, as Olmsted suggested? How did we end up with Berkeley?

This new exhibit at the Berkeley Historical Society commemorates the 150th anniversary of the official selection of the name Berkeley on 24 May 1866. Curators Steven Finacom and Phyllis Gale, using documents, manuscripts, diaries, maps, images, and other sources, follow a committee of college trustees as they gathered on Founders’ Rock, an outcropping now found on the corner of Hearst Avenue and Gayley Road, to name the hamlet. It will retell the story of George Berkeley, how his name came to be attached to our campus and town, and who was involved in the naming.

Admission free; donations welcome; wheelchair accessible. Telephone: (510) 848-0181. Regular hours: Thurs.–Sat., 1 pm–4 pm. berkeleyhistoricalsociety.org


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Oakland Heritage Summer Walking Tours

Oakland Heritage Alliance is once again offering walking tours on weekends in July and August.

See the full tour schedule here.

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Free Guided Tours of the Oakland Museum

Founded in 1971, the Council on Architecture at the Oakland Museum of California supports the museum and celebrates its exceptional architecture. Its members are interested in promoting greater understanding and appreciation of the built environment through architectural tours, exhibits, and lectures.

On the first Sunday of each month, at 1 pm, members of the Council on Architecture lead tours featuring the museum’s architecture and gardens. There’s much to talk about with the exciting enhancements to the building by Mark Cavagnero Associates.

For additional information, call Sandra Coleman, (510) 451-6796.

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Guided Tours of the Paramount Theatre

Public tours of the Paramount Theatre are given on the first and third Saturdays of each month, excluding holidays and holiday weekends. No reservations are necessary. Tours begin promptly at 10:00 am at the Box Office entrance on 21st Street near Broadway. The tour lasts about 2 hours and provides a full and informative view of the Theatre. Cameras are allowed. Admission is $5.00 per person. Children must be at least 10 years old, and adult chaperones are required. Please note that some areas of the tour are not wheelchair accessible.

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Your donations to BAHA
are tax-deductible.

Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association
2318 Durant Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94704

(510) 841-2242

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